Philippe Sarret receives a Research and Creation prize from Université Sherbrooke

Philippe Sarret

The Research and Innovation prizes of Université de Sherbrooke aim to highlight a scientific discovery or a significant creative production published in the year.  The Université has chosen this year to honor professor Sarret and his colleagues for their work resulting in the development of new pain-relieving drugs.   

Largest study on the long term safety of cannabis for treatment of chronic pain published by team led by Mark Ware

Dr. Mark Ware

In the " first and largest study of the long term safety of medical cannabis use by patients suffering from chronic pain ever conducted", Dr. Mark Ware and a team of researchers from across Canada have found the patients who used cannabis daily for one year did not suffer more serious adverse effects than patients who did not take cannabis.  The study was conducted in seven sites across Canada and followed over 430 patients suffering from chronic pain, half of which took cannabis, and the other half serving as controls.

Celeste Johnston receives two prizes from the American and Canadian Pain Societies

Celeste Johnston

Professor Celeste Johnston was awarded the >2015 Jeffrey Lawson Award for Advocacy for Pain Relief in Children from the American Pain Society and the 2015 Canadian Pain Society (CPS) Mentoring Award.

Yves De Koninck appointed to the Royal Society of Canada

Congratulations to Yves De Koninck for his recent appointment to the Royal Society of Canada.  His appointment text highlights: "He made seminal contributions to understanding how neurons communicate at the cellular and molecular levels, in normal and pathological pain. Equally ground-breaking are his contributions to developing novel photonics technologies to push the frontiers of neuroscience".

Read more on the Royal Society of Canada website.

Jeff Mogil and his collaborators show males and females process pain differently

Recent discoveries by Jeff Mogil and his team show that pain signals are processed differently in female and male mice. These findings will have important consequences for the development of novel treatment strategies for chronic pain sufferers.

Pain signals are transmitted in males using microglial cells, while this was shown not to be the case in females.  In females, another class of immune cells, called T cells, sound the alarm.

Search for new pain medication by Philippe Sarret featured in Le Journal de Montréal

Philippe Sarret and his work towards the development of new pain medication, or analgesics, was recently featured in Le Journal de Montréal. Read the article: Il veut trouver le remède miracle contre la douleur (in French only)

Pages

Subscribe to Quebec Pain Research Network RSS